NEHC Requests for Proposals

Guidelines and Application

 

NEHC Mission and Overview

The New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC) promotes and strengthens intellectual collaboration, interdisciplinary exchange, and innovative educational, intercultural, and curricular programming among New England Humanities centers and institutes, and the faculty, students, and regional, national, and global communities they serve. NEHC includes: Amherst College, Colby College, Dartmouth College, Northeastern University, Tufts University, the University of Connecticut, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Rhode Island, the University of Vermont, Wellesley College, and Wheaton College. The Humanities Institute of the University of Connecticut (UCHI) in Storrs, Connecticut is currently the executive and administrative hub of the NEHC.

Award Description

The New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC) is offering competitive seed grants for research initiatives in the humanities that seek to capitalize on the collaborative network of the consortium. Applications seeking to sustain, and build on, previously funded NEHC initiatives that demonstrated success are also welcome. Awards of up to $5000 will be made. (For projects whose total budgets exceed $5000 applicants must list additional committed funding sources and amounts.)  Prioritywill be given to applications demonstrating concrete plans for consortium membership involvement.Such involvement can take different forms, but will typically involve, e.g. direct collaboration between two or more member institutions and/or active and solicitation of faculty, staff, or students exclusively from member institutions.Applications are welcome from individuals or teams, but the PI must be on the faculty of a NEHC member institution. Potential areas of funding interest include the following (this list is by no means exhaustive):

  • Collaborative research projects
  • Summer Seminars
  • Study or working groups
  • Shared speakers across institutions
  • Collaborative course design
  • Exhibitions

Please submitmaterials electronically in pdf or Word docx to YOUR HUMANITIES CENTER or INSTITUTE DIRECTOR BYMARCH 30, 2020. They will then pass along the proposal to the NEHC board.

Application Procedure and Timeline

Applicationsfor the NEHC RFP must include the following:

  1. Cover page(1 page) stating
  • Title of the project
  • Name, department/program/school location, and NEHC school representation of PI(s)
  • Requested NEHC funding amount (Awards of up to $5000)
  1. Project narrative(2 pages, single spaced, 1” margins, 12pt font) detailing:
  • The goals of the project
  • How those goals address those of NEHC
  • Plans for involving NEHC member institutions and which institutions in particular will be involved
  • How those goals will be pursued
  • Names and roles of participants
  • Expected outcomes and/or deliverables
  • External funding sources, if any
  • Project timeline describing completion of project goals and outcomes
  1. CV(2 page) of Principal Investigator(s)
  2. Budget and Award Period:
  • Total budget. (For projects whose budgets exceed $5000, please list additional committed funding sources and amounts, as validated by an attached letter of support.)
  • The award period will typically not exceed one (1) calendar year and must be stated in the application timeline.

The awardees will be required to submit a detailed summary of the project at the end of their funding term.

Reporting Requirements

All PIs will be required to submit a two-page report no more than one (1) month after the end of the award period specified in the award letter. The report should detail and substantiate progress on the following elements of the project:

  • The extent to which project goals have been met
  • Specific indicators or signs of success
  • Outcomes and/or deliverables achieved
  • Number of NEHC member institutions (and faculty/students) involved

Questions and requests for more informationare encouraged and should be directed to UCHI (uchi@uconn.edu).

Colby College Launches Race and Identity Matters (RIM) Initiative

With generous support from the New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC), and from the Provost’s Office at Colby College, the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities is proud to launch Race and Identity Matters (RIM), which seeks to build a mutually supportive, intellectually stimulating network between scholars working on race and identity across all eleven NEHC campuses. The first step to launching this network is a:

 

One-Day Symposium
University of Connecticut
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday, February 29th, 2020

 

At this first RIM meeting, the focus is on highlighting the range of work on race and identity at NEHC schools, and allowing individual scholars to recognize potential areas for collaboration. To that end, 10 of the accepted scholars will be invited to prepare a 5-10-minute presentation on their current or proposed research project. Each presentation will be followed by 15 minutes of discussion where the audience discusses the research idea/plan (it will not be possible for more than 10 people to make presentations, but we hope that others will be happy to join in the conversation and forge links with like-minded researchers). Click here to apply for this symposium. Application deadline is December 6, 2019. 

Subsequent steps following the symposium include the RIM Summer Institute and a RIM Scholarship in NEHC classrooms project. Click here for more detailed information about the RIM symposium, summer institute, and the scholarship.

 

 

UNH Center for the Humanities Announces Summer Institute in Public Humanities Seed Grant Winners

University of New Hampshire Center for the Humanities announced the names of its 2019 Summer Institute in Public Humanities seed grant winners. The seed grant was funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. In addition to two awardees from Howard University, winners also include 14 graduate students and faculty members from member institutes of the New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC), including Colby College (1), Dartmouth College (1), Tufts University (1), University of Connecticut (3), University of New Hampshire (3), University of Rhode Island (1), University of Vermont (1), Wellesley College (2), and Wheaton College (1):

 

UNH Mellon Winners

 

Elena Creef, Wellesley College
“Reenacting and Remembering the Battle of Greasy Grass, aka The Battle of Little Bighorn”
A public humanities podcast and digital archive project to facilitate a cross-cultural meetup
Community Partners:30-40 Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho riders

 

Kabria Baumgartner, University of New Hampshire
Stories from the Archives: African Americans in Essex National Heritage Area
An annotated resource guide to collections and resources as well as organizations and individuals from the seventeenth century up to the present
Community Partners:National Park Service units, including curators and park historians, the Organization of American Historians, student researchers

 

Catherine Besteman, Colby College
Freedom and Captivity
A series of events and art exhibitions, podcasts, short videos, an art book, and linked courses at Maine’s colleges and universities
Community Partners:faculty at several Maine colleges and universities, a theater company, art institutions, artists, poets, scholars, activists, lawyers, playwrights and others whose work interrogates captivity as a corollary to freedom and engages with alternatives to incarceration

 

Mohamed Camara, Howard University
Interfaith Dialogue and Peacebuilding in West Africa
A forum on Interfaith Dialogue and Peacebuilding along with a digital archive, podcast, and documentary to disseminate the knowledge
Community Partners:West Africa Civil Society Forum (WACSOF) and West Africa Network for Peacebuilding (WANEP)

 

Emilie Coppinger, University of New Hampshire
Strengths Narrative Art Program (SNAP)
Art therapy program for children who have been abused or neglected and are in need of channels through which to process past experiences and feelings
Community Partners:(tentative) Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) program, Institutional Review Board (IRB), art therapists, children who have experienced abuse and neglect

 

Tyler Doggett, University of Vermont
Public Philosophy Week
Diversity of formats, including readings, group discussions, lectures, movie screenings, and tastings
Community Partners:Will vary from year to year depending on themes but may include police officers, food specialists, doctors and other professionals, comedians, documentary makers, and others

 

Megan Fountain, University of Connecticut
The Guatemala-Connecticut Community History Project
Documenting and archiving oral histories of Guatemalan immigrants and their families in Guatemala
Community Partners:A committee of Guatemalan immigrants and community activists including Unidad Latina en Accion (ULA), a grassroots organization; a team of public historians and New Haven Public Schools teachers; Columbia Center for Oral History Research; and Groundswell: Oral History for Social Change.

 

William Mason, Wheaton College
Untitled
Two concerts in Portland, Maine showcasing the music, dance, stories, and history of Somali refugees who have resettled in Maine
Community partners:high school students, Somali refugees, performers, Somali-Mainer Youth Network, residents who helped Somalis resettle in Maine

 

Jennifer Musto, Wellesley College
Wellesley College-SMCC Co-Learning Collaboratory
A Faculty Speaker Series and team-taught micro seminar program where faculty members facilitate interactive lectures with South Middlesex Correctional Center participants based on their research interests
Community Partners:Public Leadership & Action (PPLA) at Wellesley College, staff at SMCC and current and former SMCC participants who receive DOC permission to contribute

 

Tracy Perkins, Howard University
Saving Ward Valley
Conducting interviews to help tell the story of the Ward Valley anti-nuclear waste landfill campaign, creating both a digital archive and a multimedia storytelling and educational website
Community Partners:
Fort Mojave tribal chairperson, activists from the Ward Valley Campaign, Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, Aspiration, an NGO that specializes in helping activists, nonprofits and foundations use internet technology for social justice purposes

 

Hesamedin Sharifian, Tufts University
’Banned’ Stories
Devised theatre production which will reach out to Iranian citizens to share their stories of pain and separation in the wake of Muslim ban
Community Partners:a theatre director and devised theatre specialist, legal attorneys, theatre

staff, a group of Iranian students and scholars who are willing to will share their stories and embody characters on stage

 

Roberta Stewart, Dartmouth College
From Troy to Baghdad: Reading Communities and Public Humanities
Trainings in methods for harnessing world lit to create community for US Veterans engaging in “radical reading” to come to terms with service and impact of war, eventual published volume documenting experiences
Community Partners:mental health providers; veteran readers; Center for Suicide Prevention; various Vet centers, including Lowell Mass Vet Center and Student Veteran Services; (tentative) Society for Classics Studies, Women’s Classical Caucus, Classics and Social Justice, community colleges, prisons… and more

 

Fiona Vernal, University of Connecticut
A Caribbean Museum
Community-based archival collecting to lead to an oral history initiative including one-week traveling pop-up exhibits, a migration exhibit to launch the Caribbean Museum, and salons (panel discussions) about public housing, mobility, and migration
Community Partners:
Connecticut Humanities Council (CHC), The Hartford History Center at the Hartford Public Library, The West Indian Social Club (WISC), and El Instituto: The Institute of Latino, Caribbean and Latin American Studies (ELIN) at UConn, Hartford Public Schools, CREC (Capital Region Education Council)

 

Rob Widell, University of Rhode Island
Documenting Rhode Island initiative of the Oral History Lab at URI
The facilitation of a series of workshops and an open and accessible ongoing archive to document and preserve stories of activism and community organizing across Rhode Island and the surrounding region
Community Partners:George Wiley Center’s Social Movement History Project and The Collective, a woman-owned “bookstore, infoshop, lending library, reading room and community meeting space in Peacedale, Rhode Island

 

Leah Woods, University of New Hampshire
Prison Outreach Program (POP)”
To outfit a new wood shop with tools and equipment for the NH Women’s Correctional Facility so women will have the opportunity to learn marketable skills and flex their creativity through furniture making led by female instructors/mentors
Community Partners:New Hampshire Furniture Masters, NH Women’s Correctional Facility, female woodworkers

 

Walter Woodward, University of Connecticut
Doing Public Humanities: An Audio Field Guide
A multi-episode web-based podcast as an audio roadmap into how to practice engaged public humanities
Community Partners:case history participants (faculty doing public humanities)

13th Annual Black New England Conference: African American News from Slave Songs to Social Media

Registration is open for the 13th annual Black New England Conference, which will be held October 25-26 in Manchester on the campus of Southern New Hampshire University.  The keynote speaker will be White House Correspondent April Ryan.  The UNH Center for the Humanities is pleased to be sponsoring Saturday’s lunchtime address, “Their Names Are Mine,” by spoken-word artist Rajnii Eddins. University of New Hampshire, an NEHC-member institute, is a co-sponsor of this year’s conference.

To see the schedule and to register, please visit the conference page.

Black New England Conference Poster

Amherst College Hosts Book Talk with Christian Rogowski

Cover of Christian Rogowksi's BookFilmed in 1986/87 in still-divided Berlin, Wim Wenders‘ “Wings of Desire” is both a utopian fairy tale and a fascinating time capsule of that late Cold War moment. Together with legendary French cinematographer Henri Alekan and Austrian author Peter Handke, Wenders created a multilayered filmic poem of dazzling complexity: the skies over Berlin are populated with angels bearing witness to its inhabitants’ everyday concerns. One falls in love with a beautiful young woman, a trapeze artist in a traveling circus, and decides to forfeit his immortality. Wenders’s groundbreaking film has been hailed as a paean to love, a rumination on the continued presence in Berlin of a troubled German history, as well as an homage to the life-affirming power of the cinematic imagination. Christian Rogowski guides the reader through the film’s many aspects, using archival research to bring out new insights into its making and meanings. Rogowski is a G. Armour Craig Professor in Language and Literature in the Department of German at Amherst College.

The talk is on Tuesday, October 22 at 5PM in the Center for Humanistic Inquiry (CHI) at Amherst College.

URI Conference on “Building a Collaborative Humanities Network” in New England

Interested in the public humanities? Building a project that captures and preserves stories from across New England? Looking for ideas to develop and expand an ongoing humanities project? Join us at the University of Rhode Island on Saturday, November 16th to hear about successful public humanities projects, share your own project ideas, and establish concrete plans for regional collaboration. Faculty, students, independent scholars, and others are all welcome. Limited travel funds are available.

Click here to register for the conference. For further questions please contact Professor Robert Widell, Jr. (rwidell@uri.edu).

 

Preliminary Conf. Schedule

 

Kerill O’Neill on the Creation and Role of Colby Humanities

Kerrill O’Neill, director of the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities is lead author of an article for the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) on the history of the Colby Center and the critical role that it plays in the pedagogical and intellectual mission of the College and the life of its students and faculty. Colby Center was founded in 2008 thanks to a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the support of Colby College president and administration.

CHCI Article

Northeastern Humanities Center Year in Review Features NEHC

Our colleagues at Northeastern University Humanities Center had quite the productive 2018-2019 academic year, including funding residential fellowships, and sponsoring and hosting various events and programs, the latter of which included events funded or sponsored by the New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC). With generous support from the Mellon Foundation, NEHC and its member institutes, including Northeastern, hosted a number of events as part of the Time’s Up: What Now? series, which explored current expressions of the “Time’s Up” movement, sexism, misogyny, and romance. Northeastern was also among three NEHC-member institutes to host Laurie Essig, professor of Gender, sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Middlebury College. Her visit was part of an alternative Valentines’ Day activity to discuss “feminist perspectives on online dating and romance.” Finally, Northeastern professor of history, Martin Blatt, received $9,500 in funding from the NEHC toward his project “William Apess’ Eulogy on King Philip – Public Reading and Panel Discussion.” Read about these and much more on the Northeastern Humanities Center Website.

 

Northeastern Book Images

UCHI Awarded Luce Foundation Grant for “Seeing Truth’ Exhibits

Seeing Truth Feature ImageThe University of Connecticut Humanities Institute (UCHI) is proud to be the recipient of a $275,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to support the programming of an exhibition entitled ““Seeing Truth: Art, Science, and Making Knowledge (1750-2023).” This exhibition will be presented at the William Benton Museum of Art during the 2023 academic year in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History. UConn President Thomas C. Katsouleas made the announcement at the reception marking the 19th season of UCHI’s fellowships. The grant, whose principle investigator is UCHI Director of Academic Affairs, Alexis Boylan, will bring together various scientific, cultural, and educational artifacts to challenge our notions and ideas of what counts as a “scientific” object or a work of “art.” Seeing Truth is one part of UCHI’s larger upcoming initiative entitled The Future of Truth. To learn more about Seeing Truth, visit a UConn Today article on the grant.