University of Connecticut

NEHC Request for Proposals – Applications Closed

Guidelines and Application

 

NEHC Mission and Overview

The New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC) promotes and strengthens intellectual collaboration, interdisciplinary exchange, and innovative educational, intercultural, and curricular programming among New England Humanities centers and institutes, and the faculty, students, and regional, national, and global communities they serve. NEHC includes: Amherst College, Colby College, Dartmouth College, Northeastern University, Tufts University, the University of Connecticut, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Rhode Island, the University of Vermont, Wellesley College, and Wheaton College. The Humanities Institute of the University of Connecticut (UCHI) in Storrs, Connecticut is currently the executive and administrative hub of the NEHC.

Award Description

The New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC) is offering competitive seed grants for research initiatives in the humanities that seek to capitalize on the collaborative network of the consortium. Applications seeking to sustain, and build on, previously funded NEHC initiatives that demonstrated success are also welcome. Awards of up to $5000 will be made. (For projects whose total budgets exceed $5000 applicants must list additional committed funding sources and amounts.)  Priority will be given to applications demonstrating concrete plans for consortium membership involvement. Such involvement can take different forms, but will typically involve, e.g. direct collaboration between two or more member institutions and/or active and solicitation of faculty, staff, or students exclusively from member institutions. Applications are welcome from individuals or teams, but the PI must be on the faculty of a NEHC member institution. Potential areas of funding interest include the following (this list is by no means exhaustive):

  • Collaborative research projects
  • Summer Seminars
  • Study or working groups
  • Shared speakers across institutions
  • Collaborative course design
  • Exhibitions

Please submit materials electronically in pdf or Word docx to YOUR HUMANITIES CENTER or INSTITUTE DIRECTOR BY MAY 15, 2020. They will then pass along the proposal to the NEHC board.

Application Procedure and Timeline

Applications for the NEHC RFP must include the following:

  1. Cover page (1 page) stating
  • Title of the project
  • Name, department/program/school location, and NEHC school representation of PI(s)
  • Requested NEHC funding amount (Awards of up to $5000)
  1. Project narrative (2 pages, single spaced, 1” margins, 12pt font) detailing:
  • The goals of the project
  • How those goals address those of NEHC
  • Plans for involving NEHC member institutions and which institutions in particular will be involved
  • How those goals will be pursued
  • Names and roles of participants
  • Expected outcomes and/or deliverables
  • External funding sources, if any
  • Project timeline describing completion of project goals and outcomes
  1. CV (2 page) of Principal Investigator(s)
  2. Budget and Award Period:
  • Total budget. (For projects whose budgets exceed $5000, please list additional committed funding sources and amounts, as validated by an attached letter of support.)
  • The award period will typically not exceed one (1) calendar year and must be stated in the application timeline.

The awardees will be required to submit a detailed summary of the project at the end of their funding term.

Reporting Requirements

All PIs will be required to submit a two-page report no more than one (1) month after the end of the award period specified in the award letter. The report should detail and substantiate progress on the following elements of the project:

  • The extent to which project goals have been met
  • Specific indicators or signs of success
  • Outcomes and/or deliverables achieved
  • Number of NEHC member institutions (and faculty/students) involved

Questions and requests for more information are encouraged and should be directed to UCHI (uchi@uconn.edu).

Day of NEHC-DH: Digital Scholarship in New England

May 14, 2019

Humanities Institute Conference Room,

University of Connecticut

https://humanities.uconn.edu/

Storrs, CT

 

Schedule

 

9-9:30 Breakfast and Welcome by Anke Finger (DHMS-UConn)

9:30-11 Session 1: DH at NEHC Institutions (intros, structures, projects, concentrations, stakeholders)

11-12:30 Session 2: Resources (strengths at each institution, needs, networks)

 

12:30-2:00 Lunch

 

2-3pm Projects and Goals: what can NEHC-DH do for us? What can we do for NEHC-DH?

3-4pm Breakout session (groups work on defined projects or goals)

4-5pm Discussion and next-steps for NEHC-DH

 

6pm Dinner at local restaurant

 

Participants: Colby College, Dartmouth College, Northeastern University, University of New Hampshire, University of Vermont, Wheaton College

Day of NEHC-DH at UConn

DHMS at the UConn Humanities Institute will be hosting the first “Day of NEHC-DH” on May 14 at UConn.

One aim of the meeting in May is to identify from each of the 11 member institutions at least one representative to serve as a core member of our initial NEHC-DH working group. Our long-term goal is to build on the NEHC’s existing strengths by developing a solid network of DH practitioners in New England and a shared digital repository featuring collaborative, interdisciplinary research and instruction

More details and a schedule are forthcoming.

Living Objects: African-American Puppetry

The University of Connecticut is hosting Living Objects, an exhibition, festival, and symposium on African-American puppetry.

Activities for the Living Objects: African American Puppetry Festival and Symposium will take place in various venues on UConn’s Storrs campus Feb. 8 to 10, with related festival events with UConn Hartford at the Hartford Public Library on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019, and at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art on Saturday, Feb. 9, 2019.

Attendees have two options to participate in Living Objects Festival and Symposium events:

  1. Living Objects performances in Storrs and Hartford are open to the public. Individual tickets can be purchased at bimp.ticketleap.com.
  2. To attend all Living Objects Festival and Symposium events, including performances, panel discussions, film screenings, and more, registration is required. Registration can be completed at www.cvent.com/d/bbqbh7.

These events are part of the current Ballard Institute exhibition Living Objects: African American Puppetry, on display through April 7, 2019, which for the first time brings together historical and contemporary puppets, masks, and performing objects by African American artists and puppeteers. Many of the exhibition’s contributors, as well as scholars from around the United States, will come together at the festival and symposium to celebrate the past, present, and future of African American puppetry.

Exhibition co-curator Paulette Richards, a teaching artist and Fulbright Scholar, writes that “since their arrival in the Americas, African people have animated objects in a rich variety of forms and contexts, animating objects to represent their experiences and identity.” The Living Objects: African American Puppetry Festival and Symposium will highlight such work by contemporary African American artists, while also contextualizing the evolution of African American object performance.

Artists and puppeteers performing in the festival and symposium include Tarish “Jeghetto” Pipkins, Megan Piphus, Nehprii Amenii, Schroeder Cherry, David Liebe Hart, Dirk Joseph, Pandora Gastelum, Brad Brewer, Gabrielle Civil, Bruce Cannon, Nate Puppets, Yolanda Sampson, Edna Bland, and Paulette Richards.

In the Crosshairs: Dispatches from Central America 1983-1990

University of Connecticut, Storrs is hosting In the Crosshairs: Dispatches from Central American 1983-1990, featuring the photographs and field reports of Scott Wallace, February 15-March15 at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center.

A panel discussion featuring Wallace, Jon Lee Anderson of The New Yorker, photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg will be held on February 20, 4PM, at the Konover Auditorium.

Fellowship opportunities at University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut Humanities Institute invites applications for residential fellowships. Fellowships offers a stipend, office, and all the benefits of a Research I university. Just as important, we offer community, space, and time for scholars to write, argue, engage, and create.

Year-long fellowships are open to humanities professors, independent scholars, writers, museum and library professionals. Take advantage of the research facilities, archives and special collections, and museums with ideal proximity to Hartford, Boston, and New York City.

Application materials must be received by February 1, 2019.

Time’s Up: What Now?

Time's Up: What Now?

In the coming months,  Amherst College, the University of Connecticut, and Wellesley College will be hosting speakers as part of the event series Time's Up: What Now?

The first speaker will be Kate Manne, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Cornell University and author of Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny. Professor Manne will be visiting the three campuses for a variety of events from October 29-November 2.

More information about events and future speakers will be added at a later date.